Grant Cameron

Grant Cameron

Alerting firefighters quickly and effectively is a crucial element in successfully dealing with any emergency situation. However, alerting volunteer firefighters can be a challenge on its own.

First, the recent switch from wideband to narrowband radio technology has led to a loss of paging coverage. Therefore, some dispatch calls are simply not received anymore. Furthermore, incumbent pagers often don't live up to today's expectations in terms of efficiency, quality and cost efficiency — a bar raised by cellular applications.

The s.QUAD Voice pager by Swissphone is an extremely rugged analog pager with radio sensitivity that allows fire services to extend the coverage of their existing paging networks significantly. The quality of the pager also helps reduce replacement and repair costs dramatically.

“With the s.QUAD Voice pager, my replacement costs and repair costs have dropped 97 per cent, compared to the old Minitors," said Fire Chief John Kramer of Monitor Township Fire Department in Bay City, Mich.

At the same time, the s.QUAD's Bluetooth interface allows it to be connected to your smartphone. With the smartphone serving as a gateway, this innovation allows you to receive alphanumeric messages on your pager long before the crystal-clear voice dispatch comes through.

A multi-colored flashing LED visually supports the alarm, further indicating the urgency of the alert.

In spite of its compact size, the s.QUAD Voice pager is water- and dust-proof and is one of the most rugged pagers in the world (6.5 feet drop test).

The pager is comfortable to wear and the screen is always protected. The s.QUAD Voice, with its alert volume of >95 dB(A) @ one ft, can be a rather boisterous companion.

If the pager needs to be used for a longer period of time and there is no power source available the s.QUAD Voice can also run on a single AA battery.

The s.QUAD achieves a sensitivity of < 2.0 µV/m. This high sensitivity means your pager will alert when others don’t have enough signal. No other pager on the market has been able to duplicate this result.

With a simple firmware update the s.QUAD Voice pager can be upgraded into a digital POCSAG pager. At the same time, the s.QUAD app also runs on a FirstNet ready Smartphone, allowing you to extend your alerting network coverage through FirstNet hybrid paging. s.QUAD Voice, therefore, provides great investment protection for many years.

Swissphone has been developing and producing high-quality alerting devices for more than 45 years. The family-owned business has more than 250 employees in the U.S. and Europe.

Click here for more information about the s.QUAD Voice pager and Swissphone.



The Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs (OAFC) is thrilled to be working in partnership with Jenny's Heroes Canada once again to support volunteer firefighters across Ontario. 

Jenny's Heroes Canada has decided to offer three Fire Service Equipment Grant opportunities in 2019.

The majority of fire departments in Ontario rely on the services of volunteer firefighters to provide fire protection, education and emergency first response in their communities. Due to smaller populations, with a smaller tax base, many of these departments are challenged to purchase new equipment, gear and technology to protect these firefighters so they can provide the skilled, competent and caring services to the residents they are committed to protect.

Through Jenny’s Heroes Canada, the Jenny Jones Foundation is offering grants of up to $25,000 to provide safety equipment to Ontario’s volunteer fire departments. 

“I have a profound respect for anyone who chooses a life of service to the community,” says Jenny, “even more so when the risks are great.”

Jones grew up in London, Ont. and wishes to give back to her home province.

In May 2018, the Jenny Jones Foundation reached out to the OAFC with a vision to give back to those who serve in their communities, and where a financial contribution would make a significant impact.

The OAFC immediately recognized the potential to work with Jenny by providing a medium to reach those departments in Ontario where this opportunity would make a significant difference. In addition, the opportunity aligned well with the OAFC’s mandate to provide access to resources that help support its members’ role as fire and emergency service leaders in their communities. 

In July 2018, the OAFC and Jenny Jones launched Jenny’s Heroes Canada Fire Service Equipment Grant to support volunteer fire services in Ontario. There was an overwhelming response from departments across Ontario with more than 100 applications received.

Both the OAFC and Jenny were amazed at the incredible response and participation in such an exciting opportunity. After a final review and based on the significant need identified through the application process, Jenny decided to increase the amount of her Jenny’s Heroes Canada grant to $50,000 from the original amount of $25,000, offering grants to six departments that purchased an array of equipment to assist in their public safety efforts. 

“Wow. We received more applications than anyone expected,” says Jenny. “It’s clear the need is great, so I remain committed to continue providing safety equipment to Ontario’s volunteer firefighters. Let’s keep it going!”   

Jenny’s Heroes Canada has decided to offer three Ontario Fire Service Equipment Grant Opportunities in 2019, for up to $25,000 for each opportunity.

Click here for more information about the grants, criteria and the application process.









Vaughan Fire & Rescue Service (VFRS) recently received a $10,000 grant from TransCanada for its firefighter camp for young women ages 15 to 18 years. 
International Safety in Newmarket is introducing the Spartan Fire Hydrant manufactured by Sigelock. The company says it revolutionizes municipal firefighting with the first major overhaul to hydrant design in a century, and will reduce municipal budgets and increase operational readiness at the same time.

The company says the hydrant opens quicker and easier than standard fire hydrants, dramatically reduces the chance of freezing in winter due to a new patented lower valve and drain system, and has caps and nozzles that will not rust, seize or corrode – even in the harshest environments.

The hydrant is built from rugged ductile iron and coated with super-durable Thermoset powder coating paint which means there will be no cost of labour for painting.

Internal parts are made from marine-grade 304 stainless steel which means there will be no money spent on replacements.

The company also says there will be no more water loss from leaks or theft, as built-in security allows authorized access only.

The hydrant is made in the U.S. and comes with a 25-year limited warranty on material and workmanship. It is certified for use in Canada.

The hydrant has Dry Barrel Design and meets applicable parts of ANSI/AWWA C502 standard.

Click here more information about the hydrant.
The Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs (OAFC) is applauding the provincial government for introducing legislation that will allow full-time firefighters to volunteer as firefighters in their communities.

The legislation, known as Bill 57, the Restoring Trust, Transparency and Accountability Act, 2018, was introduced in the Legislature earlier this week.

Presently, the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997 (FPPA) prohibits full-time firefighters from serving as volunteer firefighters.

Firefighting full time and volunteering on the side is known as “two-hatting” or “double hatting.”

If passed, Schedule 18 of Bill 57 will amend the FPPA to, among other things, enhance protections for volunteer firefighters engaged in double-hatting and address collective bargaining and interest arbitration in the sector.

The OAFC maintains that the legislation, if passed, will protect firefighters who are employed full time and chose to volunteer as a firefighter in the community where they live.

 The OAFC said in a statement that it is also pleased to see proposed changes to reform the interest arbitration process, which will help municipalities' evidence “local economic realities to be fully considered” by the arbitrator.

“We commend the Ford government for acting on these long-standing issues, and look forward to continuing to work together, protecting our firefighters, and ultimately keeping Ontario's residents safe," OAFC president Stephen Hernen, who is fire chief for the Town of Huntsville, said in a statement.

Finance Minister Vic Fedeli introduced the proposed move as part of the province’s 2018 economic outlook and fiscal review.

The changes would prevent firefighters from being disciplined, fined or suspended if they want to volunteer on the side.

Specifically, the legislation would amend the FPPA to prohibit employers and employers’ organizations from refusing to employ a person as a firefighter, refusing to assign a person to fire protection services or discharging a firefighter because the person has worked, is working, or intends to work as a volunteer firefighter.

The legislation’s enhanced protections for two-hatters are expected to provide all workplace parties – both associations and employers alike – with much needed clarity on their rights and responsibilities towards volunteer firefighters in relation to the longstanding issue.

If passed in its current form, Schedule 18 clarifies that working as a volunteer firefighter will not constitute “unlawful activity.” Accordingly, associations will not be permitted to require employers to discharge firefighters because they have, are or intend to work as a volunteer firefighter.
The legislation also proposes the FPPA be amended so that the present three-member arbitration boards be replaced with single arbitrators for dispute resolution.


The amendments also include new criteria to be taken into consideration in an arbitrator’s decision and a requirement that an arbitrator provide written reasons for a decision at the request of either party.

The OAFC represents more than 700 chief fire officers in Ontario, from across 442 municipalities, who are responsible for the management and delivery of fire, rescue and emergency response to 13 million residents.

Jeremy Inglis, deputy fire chief at the Fort Erie Fire Department in Ontario, is a man on a very specific mission.
So, it’s official. Recreational use of cannabis is now legal in Canada. Let the games begin.
The Brantford Fire Department is honouring those who served in the First World War in a unique way, The Brantford Expositor reports  | READ MORE

Dräger has released a new series of single-gas monitors. The Pac 6000, 6500, 8000 and 8500 monitors detect not only standard gases such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and oxygen (Pac 6000 and 6500), but also special gases such as ozone, phosgene and nitrogen dioxide (Pac 8000).

In addition, the Pac 8500 is available with dual sensors for hydrogen sulfide/carbon monoxide or oxygen/carbon monoxide, and a hydrogen-compensated carbon monoxide sensor. This significantly reduces the influence of hydrogen on the indication of carbon monoxide.

As quick and reliable gas measurement is extremely important in an industrial environment, the Pac series detectors provide precise results, and are very easy to use.

Users can choose between 18 long-life sensors for the detection of up to 33 gases. The industrial battery used in the monitors enables a service life of two years without a battery change. Existing accessories can also be used with the new monitors.

An integrated "D-Light" shows the user whether the monitor is functional and ready for operation. In addition to the current gas concentration, a large display also provides other important information, such as remaining battery capacity, target gas or remaining service life.

The Pac series withstands harsh operating conditions. The sensors can be used in a temperature range from -40 to 131 degrees Fahrenheit. An easily replaceable membrane filter protects the sensor against foreign substances such as dust or liquids.

The impact and chemical-resistant housing meets the requirements of IP68. Each sensor type is identified by a colour code. This means that mix-ups are practically impossible.

Pac series monitors display the respective highest concentration measured. Alarms are issued acoustically, visually and with a clearly noticeable vibration, and users can access acknowledged alarms at a later time. 

Click here for more information about Dräger’s product line of single-gas detection devices.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can affect firefighters. Studies have found that 17 to 22 per cent of first responders are struggling with the problem.
Fire chiefs and those aspiring to move up the ladder to become leaders of departments must be fully dedicated to the profession, embrace change and demonstrate a commitment to lifelong learning, says Lyle Quan, an emergency services and risk management principal at LPQ Solutions in Guelph.
It was Nov. 17, 1990, a night that Tyler Pelke, deputy chief at Red Deer Emergency Service, will never forget.
Eight years ago, Christopher Howe hit rock bottom.
The Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs (CAFC) held its Fire-Rescue Canada 2018 conference Sept. 16 to 19 in Ottawa, with a series of speakers, sessions and lightning talks to educate fire service leaders.
The #MeToo movement against sexual harassment and assault is gaining traction around the world – and rightfully so.
Gayanne Pacholzuk, a fire prevention officer with the Kelowna Fire Department in British Columbia, will be bringing the message of fire safety to elementary school children in Ethiopia in November.

Pacholzuk is joining a medical team from RESTOR International that is going to the African country to provide free, life-altering surgeries to children and young adults with disabling and disfiguring contractures as a result of burns.

“I look forward to being a part of the RESTOR team this year and being able to share my knowledge with Ethiopian people in hopes that some of the burn injuries can be prevented in the future,” she said.

Pacholzuk, who has more than 21 years in the fire service, will work with the fire department in Bahir Dar and oversee the translation of fire prevention educational materials into Amharic, the official language in Ethiopia.

At the Kelowna department, she oversees fire inspections, fire investigations, and public education. She is very active in the push for fire prevention and awareness across Canada and is president with the Fire Prevention Officer’s Association of B.C.

Pacholzuk is on a committee for the National Building Code as well as two technical committees with the National Fire Protection Association, specializing in life safety in buildings and building construction.

She is also very active with the B.C. Professional Firefighters Burn Fund and has volunteered as a camp counsellor for the past six summers at a camp for children who are burn survivors.

RESTOR International said in a statement that the organization is thrilled to have Pacholzuk accompany the team to teach a sample program in elementary schools.

RESTOR is a non-profit, humanitarian organization that helps disadvantaged children and adults in developing countries.
The B.C. Professional Fire Fighters' Burn Fund celebrated its 40th anniversary Oct. 18 by hosting more than 40 local firefighters at Capilano Suspension Bridge Park in Vancouver.

The Burn Fund is a registered charity established in April 1978 by the B.C. Professional Fire Fighters and provides life-saving, life-supporting, and life-enriching services to the people in B.C.

Throughout its history, the Burn Fund has played a big part in enhancing the quality of care a burn and trauma patient receives from bedside through to recovery.
The Burn Fund and Capilano Suspension Bridge Park are linked by events that took place in 2007.

That year, severe winter storms caused major damage to Bright Nights Christmas lights display in Stanley Park, severely impacting donations to the Burn Fund. At the same time, a 46-ton tree fell onto Capilano Suspension Bridge, closing the park for five months.

To celebrate the bridge re-opening,
Nancy Stibbard, owner and CEO of Capilano Group, decided to hold a fundraiser for the Burn Fund to help replenish lost donations from its annual holiday event.

That was the beginning of a beautiful friendship, as partial proceeds from Canyon Lights at Capilano Suspension Bridge Park have been donated to the Burn Fund ever since.
Through the generosity of donors such as the Capilano Group, the Burn Fund has achieved many significant accomplishments. This includes the notable achievement of completing a $13.1-million capital campaign to raise funds to build the new Burn Fund Centre in 2015 – a home away from home for burn and trauma survivors.

Stibbard's donations have exceeded $425,000 and her continued financial support through Canyon Lights has played a significant role in bringing awareness to the Burn Fund. She will be recognized at this year's Responder Dinner Gala on April 27, 2019.

The B.C. Professional Fire Fighters' Burn Fund has been providing prevention and survivor support programs and funding medical care and training for the people of B.C. and the Yukon for almost four decades. The Burn Fund is built by more than 3,800 professional firefighters from 53 communities in B.C. and the Yukon who dedicate their funds and time to the cause.

Click here to watch a video of the event.

Click here to learn more about the Burn Fund.





Perth-Wellington MPP Randy Pettapiece has re-introduced the Rea and Walter Act (Truss and Lightweight Construction Identification) at Queen’s Park in an effort to improve firefighter safety.

The Act, known as Bill 33, will require commercial and industrial buildings, as well as certain multi-family dwellings using truss and lightweight construction (TLC), to be marked by an identification emblem.

Buildings containing TLC will be required to post 1 of 3 emblems:
  • “F” decals if only the floor of the building uses TLC.
  • “R” decals if only the roof of the building uses TLC.
  • “FR” decals if both the floor and the roof of the building use TLC.
The Act is in honour of two North Perth fire service members. Ken Rea and Ray Walter died in 2011 when the roof of a store constructed with TLC collapsed while fighting a fire.

“Firefighters need to know which buildings contain truss and lightweight construction,” Pettapiece said. “When a fire breaks out they need to know how to attack it safely.”

The Rea and Walter Act was wiped off the legislative agenda when the previous Liberal government prorogued the legislature in March 2018.

Pettapiece noted that a fire at Tim Horton’s in Arthur, Ont., on July 21 demonstrated once again the need for truss and lightweight construction identification.

In response to the incident Wellington North Fire Service Chief Dave Guilbault said, “We were not aware that the roof trusses were lightweight. There was no way of knowing. There could have been serious injuries or loss of life.”

Pettapiece said the Rea and Walter Act will restore trust and accountability between fire departments, municipalities and small business owners.

“I am hopeful this bill will again receive all-party support,” he said after tabling it in the Legislature. “I am looking forward to working with all of my colleagues and stakeholder groups across the province. It is the minimum standard our firefighters should expect.”

Lind Equipment of Markham, Ont., recently received honours in the 2018 Pro Tool Innovation Awards for two of its products, the Beacon LED Tower and the Beacon120 LED Highbay.

A panel of judges made up of tool and media professionals from across the United States and Canada weighed in on entries from top global manufacturers.

The Beacon LED Tower won the commercial site lighting category and the Beacon120 LED Highbay was a finalist in the temporary site lighting category.

Sean Van Doorselaer, CEO and chief designer officer at Lind Equipment, said the company is incredibly proud to earn accolades for the two products.

“Product design and innovation are key to what we do here at Lind Equipment,” he said. “Frankly, design matters, and building world-beating products is how we help our customers work confidently.”

The judges had some great praise for the Beacon LED Tower, saying, “What happens when you need a lot of light for exterior locations? Lind Equipment has broken the barrier and their Beacon LED Tower light puts out 120,000 lumens from four 200-watt LED lights.

“The system has a fuel tank that gives you up to 45 hours of runtime from a standard 2000-watt generator that you’ll need to supply. It’s designed to be transported and set up by a single person if necessary. When powerful lighting is what you need, you now have a legitimate LED option.”

Hundreds of power tools, hand tools, fasteners and accessories were judged, and winners were decided based on industry innovation.

Winners demonstrated achievement in any combination of the following: innovative features, advanced power delivery, groundbreaking ergonomics, technological advancements, and value.

The Pro Tool Innovation Awards recognize best-in-class products that are truly ahead of their time.

This year, more than 60 different tool manufacturers submitted nearly 300 tool entries in dozens of categories for a shot to win a 2018 Pro Tool Innovation Award.

Clint DeBoer, executive director of the Pro Tool Innovation Awards, said manufacturers are consistently improving their tools, but each year some exceed the norms and develop products which truly deserve recognition.

“Business owners, builders, contractors, and tradespeople really need to understand which products can help them work smarter and more efficiently,” he said. “Often, they can also save a lot of money in either material costs or time-savings. That innovation goes straight into their pocketbook."

The Pro Tool Innovation Awards are an annual awards program judged by a panel of professional tradesmen and trade media representatives in the electrical, plumbing, MRO, and concrete fields as well as general contractors and builders.

Lind Equipment is a leading manufacturer of portable LED lighting, hazardous location and industrial work lighting, portable power, static grounding, and GFCI products.

Click here for more information about the company and its products.





Toronto Fire Services has launched an advertising and public education campaign aimed at encouraging smokers in the Parkdale area of the city to stop tossing their cigarette butts. 

Data shows that Parkdale, over a five-year period, had more fires started from careless smoking than any other area of Toronto. Many of these fires occurred on balconies as a result of tenants discarding their lit cigarette butts by throwing them from their balconies. 

The campaign includes transit shelter posters, restobar (combined restaurant and bar) ads, posters on construction hoarding sites in the Parkdale neighbourhood, as well as geo-targeted social media and features two themes. The first campaign design depicts a hand holding a lit cigarette with the tagline, "Don't be a flicking idiot … tossed butts start fires." The second design shows a teddy bear on fire with the tagline, "Kill your butts, not your neighbours … tossed butts start fires." 

The advertising campaign will continue through November 11. A public education campaign will be carried out in conjunction with the ad campaign that will include firefighters visiting businesses and residents to convey the message that cigarette butts need to be completely extinguished before being discarded. 

"With this ad campaign, we're reminding residents that we all are responsible for keeping each other safe from fire," said Fire Chief and General Manager Matthew Pegg. "Our message is simple. Make sure your cigarettes are completely extinguished before you discard them, and discard them properly." 

"Parkdale is a tight-knit community that is known for being unique, colourful and diverse," said Gord Perks, the councillor of Ward 14. "What Parkdale should not be known for is the neighbourhood with the most fires due to careless smoking. This fire services campaign aims to change that fact and I'm confident we can reduce the number of fires started by improperly extinguished cigarette butts." 

To help highlight this issue, generic fire prevention messaging is being augmented with specific messaging to target residents who live in the fire-prone area of Parkdale. This campaign is the first done by Toronto Fire Services to focus on a specific area and target audience in an effort to deliver relevant, impactful and behaviour-changing communications. A public education risk assessment that included risks, geographic profiles, demographic profiles and marketing profiles aided in message targeting. 

Through this targeted ad campaign, Toronto Fire Services encourages Parkdale residents to understand the true cost of careless smoking and persuades them to adopt safer smoking habits. More information is available at 
toronto.ca/smokingsafety

For a video of the announcement go to https://mobile.twitter.com/i/broadcasts/1yNGaXYdOoRKj


Page 1 of 2

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.