Wildland
Written by Ed Brouwer
The BC Wildfire Service uses a ranking scale from one to six to quickly describe fire behaviour based on a set of visual indicators.
Written by Ed Brouwer
Wildland urban interface fires can be one of the most dangerous calls we go on, but perhaps not for the reasons you may suspect.   
Written by David Moseley
The use of sprinklers for structural protection from wildfires was heavily employed in British Columbia during the summer of 2017. Crews from Lac La Biche County in northern Alberta spent six weeks there doing structural protection, which involved largely setting up sprinklers.
Written by David Moseley
Increasingly, municipal firefighters are being called to fight wildland fires and fires in the wildland urban interface. Departments should cultivate a good understanding of wildland fire behaviour, suppression techniques, and above all, safety. One less familiar tactic municipal firefighters sometimes face is the use of bulldozers (dozers) in fireline construction. This article will provide an overview of why and how dozers are used to control wildfires.
Written by Ed Brouwer
As I’m writing this column, the news reported that three more deaths have been confirmed in the wildfires burning in northern California’s wine country, which were already the deadliest series of such fires in state history. The death toll had reached 42 by the afternoon of Oct. 20. An estimated 8,400 homes and businesses were destroyed. The photos of the fires, which caused more than US $1 billion in damages, are mind numbing.
Written by Ed Brouwer
The summer’s wildfire season in British Columbia’s Southern Interior was unprecedented: multiple fires started in our drought-ravaged area and kept us busy well into September.
Written by David Moseley
Wildfires can, and have, happened at any time of the year, but there is something special about the middle of May in northern Alberta. For those involved, the Redwater, Newbrook, Opal or Grassland fires were big deals, but the Slave Lake fire in 2011 made everyone sit up and take notice. While we hope we never have to face a fire that destructive, those other fires tell us that while the impact to Slave Lake was unique, in Alberta we had better be prepared for May wildfires.
Written by Ed Brouwer
During our fight with the fire dragon this past summer, our Hot Shot crew frequently took a few moments to reflect on the 19 LODDs in Prescott, Ariz.
Written by Paul Dixon
On April 15th, B.C.’s minister of forests issued a press release predicting that the province might be in for another scorching summer on the heels of 2009, the worst fire season on record.
Written by Ed Brouwer
Wildland fires are associated with out-of-control burning, high intensity, high flames and high rates of spread. Fed by high temperatures, low humidity and low rainfall, the fire-prone vegetation that shares space with manmade structures can destroy whole communities. Each year, there are thousands of forest fires in Canada. Although most are far from populated areas, there have certainly been tragic exceptions.
Written by Blair Watson
Already this spring Canadians have seen images of water bombers and helicopters putting out brush fires in Nova Scotia and British Columbia. Planning for the spring/summer fire season and maintaining the necessary equipment is crucial to managing forest fires and wildland/urban interface fires.
Written by James Careless
On April 30, just 11 months after the Halifax Regional Fire & Emergency Service battled one of the worst wildland/urban interface in the province’s history, another fast-moving consumed 800 hectares of land north of Halifax and forced 1,200 people from their homes.
Written by Paul Dixon
Another warm, sunny summer day in Vancouver. With Labour Day approaching, it has been one of the best summers in memory, with no appreciable rain for more than two months. The fire hazard in the forests of Vancouver’s North Shore is extreme.
Written by Ed Brouwer
I recently returned from speaking at the 14th Annual FDIC Atlantic, hosted by the Nova Scotia chapter of the International Society of Fire Service Instructors and the Maritime Association of Fire Chiefs.
Written by Ed Brouwer
As the number of people moving into the scenic wildlands increases, so does the probability of wildland fires posing some threat to homes and other structures.  Wildfire plays an important role in our forests and grasslands. It recycles nutrients by clearing out accumulated dead vegetation, thins tree stands and cracks seed casings, thereby creating a diverse wildlife habitat. So, like it or not, living in forested areas means living with fire. 
Written by Ed Brouwer
Wildland fire behaviour for structural fire fighters (1st of a series)
Written by Ed Brouwer
Wildland fire behaviour for structural fire fighters (2nd of a 2-part series)
Written by Ed Brouwer
Sizeup key to fighting interface fires

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